Family Research – English, Scottish and Irish Genealogy

Archive for the ‘General’ Category

Mary Cameron of Talisker-1897

Saturday, February 5th, 2011


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Jamaica and Argyle Street,Glasgow 1930

Saturday, February 5th, 2011


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Topographical, architectural and engineering plans in the NAS

Saturday, February 5th, 2011

The National Archives of Scotland (NAS) has a series of records known as the Register House Plans (RHP). It is an artificial collection of around 150,000 topographical plans, marine charts, architectural and engineering drawings (for convenience, the term ‘plan’ will be used to refer to all categories). Owing to their size and varied formats, plans require special storage conditions. It was therefore decided in the 1960s that plans should be removed from their collections and added to the RHP series, with a cross-reference back to the parent collection. This policy was not always rigorously adhered to, however, and it is still possible to find smaller plans in their original files or bundles. for more click here

Newest Genealogy Records on the Internet

Saturday, February 5th, 2011

Below is a listing of the newest genealogy records that have become available on the internet (these records are also listed by country and many can be searched using our free Genealogy Search Engine): for more click here

Fun Facts About FamilySearch

Saturday, February 5th, 2011

FamilySearch has the largest collection of free genealogy records on the internet thanks to the dedicated work of thousands of volunteers. With the latest large release of 72 million records last week, FamilySearch has reached a very important milestone. Volunteers have now transcribed over 500 million genealogy records online. for more click here

Edith MacDonald (centre) snd Friends-Fasach House,Waternish c1890

Friday, February 4th, 2011


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Mary Bligh Fuller (nee Wall)-1874

Friday, February 4th, 2011


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Herbert Franklin (1851-1927)

Friday, February 4th, 2011


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Victorian London Cemeteries

Friday, February 4th, 2011

The public cemetery, as distinct from the churchyard, as a proper place for burial, originated in the Victorian period. Under common law, every parishioner and inhabitant of a parish had a right to be buried in his or her parish churchyard or burial ground. There were few exceptions to this right of Christian burial. An Act of 1823 put an end to the practice of burying suicides in some public highway with a stake driven through them and directed that they be buried in the usual churchyard, but between the hours of 9 p.m. and midnight, and without rites of the Church. However, the compulsory dissection of murderers’ bodies was not abolished until 1832, and hanging in chains lingered on until 1834. for more click here

London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812

Friday, February 4th, 2011

This data collection contains baptism and burial records from 1538-1812 and marriage records from 1538-1753 for more than 10,000 Church of England parish registers from parishes in the greater London area. It also includes Bishop’s Transcripts – copies of parish registers sent to the bishop of a diocese.

Records are typically arranged in chronological order. Names in these records have not yet been indexed. However, this collection can be searched. for more click here

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