Family Research – English, Scottish and Irish Genealogy

Archive for 2010

The Coats of Arms of the Knights of the Thistle-Thistle Chapel,St Giles,Edinburgh

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010


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(c) John Arthur

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Images on St Giles,Edinburgh

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010


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(c) John Arthur

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Entrance to the Thistle Chapel-St Giles,Edinburgh

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010


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(c) John Arthur

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1911 England Census Summary Books

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

The British government took its first national census in 1801. A census has been taken every ten years since that date, except in 1941. The first genealogically useful census, however, was not taken until 1841 when names were recorded. This database holds census books for the year 1911 in England and offers additional information about the population due to the governments’ concerns about health issues in the population, frequent emigration from the country, and the rapid rise and decline of several industries, which prompted them to collect additional data. Some information is missing because many women boycotted the 1911 census — refusing to be counted— in response to the government’s denial of the vote to women. for more click here

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1841 England Census

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.
Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. for more click here

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1901 England Census

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Ancestry.com. 1901 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.
Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives, 1901. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. for more click here

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Start your family tree this holiday season

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Creating a family tree is always a worthwhile experience. This week, from December 26th, 2010 to January 1st, 2011 is Ireland’s first ever Start your family tree week, and with plenty of exiles home for Christmas to gain information from, now is the perfect time to start your family tree.

We highly recommend a great online service known as Geni to create your tree. Geni was founded by former PayPal COO David Sacks (@davidsacks) in 2006, and aims to create a “family tree of the world”. Geni is great in the fact that it facilities a collaborative approach to genealogy. There are already 90 million profiles recorded on Geni, so chances are somebody may have already recorded branches of your tree. With this collaborative approach each researcher can add their own pieces to the jigsaw, while verifying those added by others. for more click here

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Historical Records

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Historical Records. for more click here

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Advanced Genealogy Search Engine

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Free and easy to use. Search over 1.2 billion historic records. for more click here

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Lest we forget…

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Military Records provide unique perspectives on our history. They add a vivid layer of detail to our ancestors’ lives that can be both traumatic and revelatory. Indeed, they are such a valuable resource that we invest a great deal of energy conserving and digitising them to make them easily searchable by our members. for more click here

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