Family Research – English, Scottish and Irish Genealogy

3/9/2008

UK Record Collections-Ancestry.co.uk

Royal Irish Constabulary

Demand from our members for Irish records is higher than ever and so this month the Royal Irish Constabulary enlistment records have been promoted. The collection contains more than 88,000 records of those enlisted as police in the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) from 1816 to 1921. Records include each officer’s name, year and country or county of birth or age upon enlistment, marital status and further comments such as details of death and emigration. In addition to Ireland, enlistees came from England, Scotland, Wales, and even the US and Australia. Famous names such as Sir Neville FF Chamberlain, credited as the inventor of snooker, and Charles Brew who founded the British Columbia Police, can be found in the collection. This collection is available to Premium and Worldwide Subscription members.

International News
(records available with a worldwide subscription on Ancestry.co.uk)

New South Wales Convict Death Register, Convict Ship Muster Rolls & Related Records

Continuing to expand the largest online collection of convict records, Ancestry.com.au has just launched the New South Wales Convict Death Register, Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records. The Death Register collection includes records of convict deaths in the colony, and also of those who died during their passage to Australia, with references to the cause of death, and in some cases statements justifying the death penalty. It also contains financial information relating to the deceased as they often brought money with them to deposit in the Convict Banking System. The Muster Rolls collection contains ship muster lists of convicts being transported from England to New South Wales between 1790 and 1849 and is of vital importance to family history researchers wanting to determine where and when their ancestors came from. They also contain convicts’ date and place of trial and term of sentence, as well as lists of convicts to be employed in iron gangs.

source- Ancestry.co.uk

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