Family Research – English, Scottish and Irish Genealogy

Archive for 2005

Unrest in the Highlands and Islands

Wednesday, December 21st, 2005


Due to the failure of the potato crop in 1882 violent unrest occurred in the Highlands. The picture above from the “illustrated London News” shows the depth of feeling of Lewis crofters.

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The Colonial Ancestors Database

Wednesday, December 21st, 2005

The Colonial Ancestors Database contains information about colonial ancestors posted by our visit ors. Some of the records contain the email address of the submitter. You can contact the submitter to exchange information. Other records do not have an email address. These were submitted to assist your research, but the person submitting the record has no further information. Some of the records in the database include a URL with additional information.for more click here

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Scotland and early beginnings of festive cards

Wednesday, December 21st, 2005

FOR MOST people who look forward to celebrating Christmas, it just wouldn’t be the same without the giving and receiving of special cards. Sending a greeting to family, friends and business contacts has become as much part of the festive fun as trimming the turkey with cranberry sauce or decorating the tree with baubles and chocolate treats.

But unlike the tradition of having a midwinter feast, greetings cards are a relatively recent phenomenon in the history of Christmas. The multi-million pound industry would still be many years away.for more click here

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The Christmas Truce of World War I

Tuesday, December 20th, 2005

The Christmas Truce, which occurred primarily between the British and German soldiers along the Western Front in December 1914, is an event the official histories of the “Great War” leave out, and the Orwellian historians hide from the public. Stanley Weintraub has broken through this barrier of silence and written a moving account of this significant event by compiling letters sent home from the front, as well as diaries of the soldiers involved.

His book is entitled Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce. The book contains many pictures of the actual events showing the opposing forces mixing and celebrating together that first Christmas of the war. This remarkable story begins to unfold, according to Weintraub, on the morning of December 19, 1914. for more click here

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Internet Genealogy

Tuesday, December 20th, 2005

Internet Genealogy is a new magazine from the publishers of Family Chronicle and History Magazine. Download a preview issue. Subscribe Today and Save!

The first issue will carry a cover date of April/May 2006 and will be on newsstands across North America at the end of February. A “preview issue”, tentatively set at 24-pages, will be carried in the January/February 2006 issue of Family Chronicle. This preview issue will feature sample pages from the first issue of Internet Genealogy to give the reader and advertiser a good taste of the new magazine. for more click here

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SS Aguila-19th August 1941

Monday, December 19th, 2005

The Scottish National War Memorial is a first class source of Information of Scottish war dead and are very helpful to all who approach them for help. The above letter was a query that I dealt with concerning the deaths on the SS Aguila during the Second World War.

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On top of Auld Reekie

Saturday, December 17th, 2005

CHRISTMAS AND HOGMANAY CLING TO Edinburgh perfectly; theirs is a seasonal match designed and written in heaven. A publisher’s dream. Outside, in the purlieu of the city, in Leith or Bruntsfield, in Cramond or Colinton, down the byways of the New Town, among the Old Town’s wynds and closes, the salt wind whips itself to life; a heavenly swirl of tumble-dried snowflakes fills the haloes of the street lamps. Here is the stage-set against which the murmur of indoor life takes on a studious, readerly, almost Victorian, raptness as drams and tomes are consumed by firelight and ghosts are summoned, welcomed, fêted: Stevenson, Conan Doyle, Scott, Barrie, MacCaig and behind them the live and kicking, modern, Johnny-come-latelies: Rankin, Rowling, Welsh, McCall Smith. A seasonal wordfest. A Scottish kyst. for more click here

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GeneaNet

Friday, December 16th, 2005

Our Mission is to set up a worldwide register of genealogical resources and make the power of the internet available to our users. GeneaNet aims to be universal and includes resources of all kinds : on-line, off-line, publiccly-owned, subscription-based and free. for more click here

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United Kingdom Top Databases

Friday, December 16th, 2005

For more click here

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Irish Records Extraction Database

Friday, December 16th, 2005

This 100,000-name database of Irish vital records is unique for two reasons. First, it represents one of the first major databases of records from outside the continental United States. Second, rather than just raw data, this database is accompanied by a significant amount of contextual and historical information. This information can help researchers understand the significance and the source of the data and also extend their research beyond the names available in the database. for more click here

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