Family Research – English, Scottish and Irish Genealogy

25/1/2005

Migration statistics from Census 2001

Scottish migration figures published today demonstrate that more in-migrants came to Scotland from the United States than any other country, and that most migrants were aged 16-34.

The Registrar General for Scotland today published a paper looking in more detail at characteristics of migrants, drawn from the 2001 Census.

The main findings are:

The number of migrants who came to Scotland from the rest of the UK was roughly in balance with the number of migrants who moved in the opposite direction, with Scotland gaining over 2,400 people aged 35 and over.
62% of in-migrants from overseas were aged 16-34 and 53% of in-migrants from the rest of the UK were aged 16-34.
A quarter of migrants coming from abroad were Scots born.
More overseas in-migrants came from the USA (10%) than any other country. A further 43% came from Europe, particularly Germany, France, Spain and Ireland.
Thirteen local authority areas gained migrants from elsewhere in Scotland, with West Lothian showing the biggest net gain. Argyll and Bute showed the biggest gain per head of population of migrants from elsewhere in the UK.
Duncan Macniven, Registrar General for Scotland, said:

“This paper adds detail to the picture of migration in Scotland in the year before the 2001 Census. Migrants tended to be people of working age – especially those who came from overseas, most of whom were aged 16 to 34. A lot more in-migrants came from the rest of the UK (48,000) than from overseas (29,000). While the number of people coming into Scotland is nowadays much the same as the number leaving, there are still parts of Scotland where emigration is a big problem – particularly Orkney, Shetland and the Western Isles, which lost 1% of their population through migration in the year before the Census.”

The paper is split into the following sections. Please see www.gro-scotland.gov.uk for more detailed information.

Migrants who moved between local authority areas in Scotland
Examples of the results: 1 in 45 Scots residents moved between Scottish local authority areas; the majority were aged between 16 and 34; city areas gained people aged 16-24; West Lothian highest net in-migration; Islands areas highest net out-migration.

Migrants who moved between Scotland and the rest of the United Kingdom
Examples of the results: migration in balance between Scotland and the rest of the UK; people leaving Scotland more likely to be aged 16-34 than those coming into Scotland; Scotland lost people aged 16-34 but gained people aged 0-15 and 35 & over; Argyll & Bute highest net in-migration; Shetland Islands highest net out-migration.

Migrants to Scotland from outwith the UK
Examples of the results: most migrants from overseas aged 16-34; most migrants from abroad went to the 4 main cities; more migrants came from Europe than any other continent; more migrants came from the United States than any other country; a quarter of foreign migrants were returning Scots.

Scots living elsewhere in the UK and non-Scots living in Scotland
Examples of the results: nearly twice as many Scots-born lived in England as English-born in Scotland; difference even more marked for those aged 45 and over; nearly twice as many Northern Ireland-born people lived in Scotland as Scots-born in Northern Ireland; difference most marked for those aged 16-24; more English-born people moved to Scotland in the year before the Census than Scots-born moved to England; more English-born people moved back to England in the year before the Census than Scots-born came back to Scotland.

Migrants who moved between urban and rural areas in Scotland
Examples of the results: 1 in 36 Scots residents moved between different types of area; accessible rural areas had the highest net in-migration; remote rural areas had the highest net out-migration; migration patterns for 16-24 age group very different from other migrants.

Migrants moving between Scottish urban/rural areas and the rest of the UK
Examples of the results: remote rural areas had the highest net in-migration; large urban areas gained 16-24 year olds but lost all other age groups.

Migrants from abroad to different Scottish urban/rural areas
Examples of the results: most migrants from abroad moved into large urban areas.

Migrants into/out of selected local authority areas from/to rest of Scotland
Examples of the results: most employed migrants who moved out of Edinburgh commuted to the city from their new address; a fifth of employed movers between the two Lanarkshire authorities worked in Glasgow.

The paper Scotland’s Census 2001: Statistics on Migration is available from GROS Customer Service (see paragraph 4) and is also available for viewing or downloading from the GROS website at: www.gro-scotland.gov.uk.

The report “Scotland’s Population 2003: The Registrar General’s Annual Review of Demographic Trends” (published July 2004) included a chapter on migration. This paper presents further analysis as promised in the Annual Review.

The Scottish ParliamentThe UK ParliamentNational Assembly for WalesNorthernIreland AssemblyopenscotlandDirect.gov

Source-Scottish Executive

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