Family Research – English, Scottish and Irish Genealogy

Featured Posts

June 20th, 2015

Faces of pain: Harrowing portraits from Victorian lunatic asylum

These haunting portraits captured by Dr Hugh Welch Diamond between 1848 and 1858 give an insight into the harrowing lives of women forced to live out their years at Suffolk County Lunatic Asylum for paupers. Did you like this? Share it:Tweet Read more...

June 10th, 2015

The colorful criminals of turn-of-the-century Nebraska

Historical mug shots taken during the turn of the century in Nebraska have been released, revealing the wide array of crimes and even wider array of characters that wound up behind bars. Did you like this? Share it:Tweet Read more...

May 26th, 2015

Poor, alone and shipped against their will to the other side of the world

The ‘Potato Orphans’ of Australia is a tragic, little-known period in the nation’s history, in which thousands of vulnerable teenage women, orphaned by the Great Famine, were shipped from Ireland to be wives for the Australian convicts. Did you like this? Share it:Tweet Read more...

Regular posts

May 11th, 2015

Families so poor children slept in chests of drawers: Austerity?

They lived through two world wars to become our greatest generation and now, in a brilliant Mail series they are sharing their remarkable memories. On Saturday, they recalled an age when sex was worth waiting for. Today, they reveal how they coped with unimaginable hardship and grief. Did you like this? […] Read more...

May 7th, 2015

Tracing the children of the Holocaust

After World War Two, the BBC attempted to find relatives of children who had survived the Holocaust – they had lost their parents but it was believed they might have relatives in Britain. Seventy years on Alex Last has traced some of those children and found out what happened to them. […] Read more...

April 30th, 2015

Immortals! Letter hails heroes of Waterloo

Two centuries on, it remains one of the nation’s greatest military victories. But even just a day after fighting ended at Waterloo, one British soldier was declaring it ‘the most bloody as well as the most decisive battle’, a letter shows. Did you like this? Share it:Tweet Read more...

April 30th, 2015

The original lady in red

Creating romantic, sepia-toned images is a cinch now that we have Instagram filters to play with. Did you like this? Share it:Tweet Read more...

April 29th, 2015

Events, Talks and Visits

We host a variety of events, talks and visits, including lectures on historical themes and records, introductory talks on family history, school workshops and visits by groups in further and higher education and evening classes in palaeography. The seminar facility at New Register House Dome can be booked for meetings and conferences. for more click […] Read more...

April 28th, 2015

Cartoons by Stalag Luft III prisoner

Cartoons drawn by a British soldier from inside a Nazi prison camp during the Second World War are expected to fetch up to $30,000(£20,000) as part of a huge war-time auction in New York. Did you like this? Share it:Tweet Read more...

April 27th, 2015

The bullying British officer ‘murdered’ by his own side

The average lifespan of a horse at Gallipoli was one day. When I left England in early 1915, my mounted unit had 76 horses, and after three months of fighting we had nine left. The others were all killed. These horses were our best friends, and it was heartbreaking. Did you […] Read more...
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